Export Control

The purpose of this web site is to provide information about export controls for Georgia Tech’s faculty and staff, who need to be aware of the requirements of these laws and regulations and where to go for additional information and assistance with specific activities.

Research is a global endeavor and international experiences and opportunities are vital in preparing Georgia Tech’s students to become leaders who meet the challenges of the future. It is sometimes challenging to conduct these programs in compliance with complex laws and regulations that change frequently.

Because you, as an individual, and Georgia Tech can be held liable for improperly transferring controlled technology it is important that you review these federal requirements.

What is Export Control?
“Exports” include:
• Verbal communication
• Transfer of written documents, and
• Transfer of U.S. computer software to a foreign national whether in the U.S. or abroad if the technology is controlled by export regulations.

The determination of whether a technology is controlled is critical in determining whether export control laws and regulations apply to the activity. To find out if technologies or data are controlled, check the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) control lists and contact the Office of Research Integrity Assurance or by phone at 404.385.0283. Please refer to the both the EAR and ITAR web sites for a more general overview of the regulations regarding each of the above mentioned control lists.

As defined in these laws, technology includes information related to the design, development, or production of equipment or software. Transfers of listed technologies to non-U.S. persons or entities in the form of drawings, schematics, blueprints, research results, formulae, meetings, symposiums, classroom discussions, conversations, email, etc, are controlled.

If any controlled information, technology, software, or equipment will be transferred to another party overseas or to a foreign party in the United States, a license must be obtained prior to the transfer unless a valid licensing exception or exclusion applies.